FAQs

Curriculum

Curriculum frameworks are large documents, so we recommend you read them yourself. Here is a link to the most recent document on the CDE website; https://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/he/cf/documents/hefwch3tk-3.docx

Publishers take the curriculum framework and from it produce a curriculum that they can sell to local school districts. Alternatively, the school district can produce their own curriculum that complies with the Ed Code. In general, the commercial curricula that are approved by the CDE are considerably more extreme than the framework upon which they were based.

Category: Curriculum

In 2017, the CDE appointed twenty people to the Curriculum Framework Evaluation and Criteria Committee (CFCC) to revise the Health Education Framework (this includes sex education). The full list of these people and their affiliations are below. The CFCC consists mostly of public school teachers, plus a few professors, public health professionals and two representatives from Planned Parenthood.

CFCC member Amy Streavel currently works for Planned Parenthood of Orange and San Bernadino Counties.

CFCC member Lidia Carlton is also particularly noteworthy. She currently works for the California Department of Public Health, but formerly worked for Planned Parenthood of Orange and San Bernadino Counties. While there, she was part of the California Sexual Health Roundtable and the Southern California Sexual Health Collaborative (SCSHC), which included representatives from the ACLU, Planned Parenthood, and the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), the nations largest LGBTQ advocacy organization. This group lobbied for the passage of AB 329, and according to public comments from ACLU members during CPCC open meetings, was instrumental in securing funding for the framework revision.

As part of the California Sexual Health Roundtable, Ms. Carlton at least informally represents the interests of these groups (ACLU, Planned Parenthood, and Human Rights Campaign) in the drafting of the new sex education curriculum framework. As the group that secured funding for this framework revision, members of the Roundtable have considerable influence.

Members of the CFCC

Martha Adriasola-Martinez
San Francisco Unified School District

Shannon Bennett
Garden Grove Unified School District

Samantha Blackburn
California State University, Sacramento

Bridget Brownell
Los Angeles Unified School District

Lidia Carlton
California Department of Public Health
(Formerly with Planned Parenthood of Orange and San Bernadino Counties)

Cynthia Dimon
Oakland Unified School District

Diane Farthing
Pleasanton Unified School District

Matthew French
Los Angeles Unified School District

Robert LaChausse
California Baptist University

Darren McDonald
Morgan Hill Unified School District

Miguel Perez
Fresno State University

Michelle Presley
San Marcos Unified School District

Michael Riggs
Bonita Unified School District

David Rodgers
Visalia Unified School District

Robyn Russon
Burbank Unified School District

Kimberley Sinclair
Glendale Unified School District

Amy Streavel
Planned Parenthood of Orange and San Bernardino Counties

Aimee Sturges
Conejo Valley Unified School District

Jill Vandroff
San Mateo County Office of Education

Kimberley Walden
Twin Rivers Unified School District

Category: Curriculum

This is actually an important question, because some activist teachers may purposefully choose these books simply because they were removed from the Health Education Curriculum Framework. The removed titles are:

My Princess Boy
Changing You!: A Guide to Body Changes and Sexuality
The What’s Happening to My Body?: Book for Boys
The What’s Happening to My Body?: Book for Girls
S.E.X: The All You Need to Know Sexuality Guide to Get You Through Your Teens and Twenties

Category: Curriculum

No. They may be playing games with semantics. You need to know that the California Department of Education (CDE) does not consider the gender identification / transgender curriculum to be part of sex education. Therefore, your school district could be planning to incorporate the transgender curriculum (or may already have) and still think that they are being honest when they say they have no plans to incorporate the new K-6 sex education material.

So you need to specifically ask your district staff about their plans for implementing the new gender identification curriculum.

Category: Curriculum

Curriculum frameworks are created by the California Department of Education (CDE). They are grade-level subject outlines that comply with state academic standards.

School districts may or may not choose to adopt the state framework for a particular subject. Districts may then purchase a pre-packaged curriculum that is endorsed by the CDE, pick a non-endorsed curriculum, or create their own curriculum from scratch. Any of these choices, however, must comply with state law (Ed Code).

In a nutshell, curriculum is what is actually taught in the classroom. Curriculum frameworks are suggested outlines from which curriculum can be created.

Please refer to the following article for more info: https://californiaparentalliance.org/state-curriculum-frameworks-are-merely-suggestions/

Category: Curriculum

Please note that NONE of these curricula are approved or endorsed by the California Parent Alliance.

FLASH

PUBLIC HEALTH SEATTLE ‐ KING COUNTY
http://www.etr.org/flash
THEIR DESCRIPTION: FLASH is a national, science‐based curriculum that aligns with both the CDC National Health Education Standards for Sexual Health and the National Sexuality Education Standards. It is designed to be inclusive of youth from a variety of geographical regions, racial identities, and sexual orientations. FLASH has editions for high school (grades 9‐12, 15 lessons), middle school (grades 6-8, 7 lessons), and elementary school (grades 4‐5, 18 lessons and a separate All About Life edition for grades K‐4). There is also a version for Special Education students.

Making Proud Choices! California Edition

ETR ASSOCIATES
THEIR DESCRIPTION: http://www.etr.org/ebi/programs/making‐proud‐choices/ Making Proud Choices! is an evidence‐based curriculum for middle school and high school, aimed at empowering youth to change their behaviors to make responsible, healthy decisions regarding their sexual health. The curriculum includes skills‐building activities, workbooks, and supplemental DVDs.

Available for in‐classroom instruction (14 lessons, 40 minutes each) or community settings (9 modules).

Positive Prevention PLUS

POSITIVE PREVENTION PLUS
https://www.positivepreventionplus.com/curriculum/sexual-health-education
THEIR DESCRIPTION: Positive Prevention PLUS is a comprehensive curriculum for grades 4‐12 (upper elementary, middle school and high school editions), including lessons with marginal notes, pre‐post tests, family home assignments, a CD with PowerPoint and images, and other features. Written specifically for use in California, this curriculum involves 13 lessons of 50 minutes each, and is available in both English and Spanish; there is also a version for Special Education students.

Rights, Respect, Responsibility (3Rs)

ADVOCATES FOR YOUTH
https://3rs.org/3rs-curriculum/
THEIR DESCRIPTION: Rights, Respect, Responsibility (2015), is a K‐12 evidence‐informed curriculum written to meet the National Sexuality Education Standards. As a national curriculum, it does not have all of the specific content required by California (such as information about California’s newborn safe surrender law), but its comprehensive approach, focus on healthy relationships and challenging negative gender stereotypes, LGBT inclusiveness, and other elements are aligned with the California Healthy Youth Act. It consists of free lesson plans—40 minutes each for K‐5 and 50 minutes for grades 6‐12— that can be used individually or to form a complete curriculum.

Teen Talk

HEALTH CONNECTED
https://www.health-connected.org/teen-talk-high-school
THEIR DESCRIPTION: Teen Talk was developed for use in California schools and was designed to be inclusive of diverse racial, ethnic, religious, and sexual identities, for mixed‐gender classrooms. Teen Talk Middle School (grades 7‐8) includes 12 lessons, and Teen Talk High School (grade 9) includes 11 lessons varying between 50‐75 minutes each. Puberty Talk is also available for grades 5 and 6. All activities are available in English and Spanish

Category: Curriculum

Once a new Ed Code is passed by the legislature and signed by the governor, the California Department of Education (CDE) incorporates the law into the “Standards” for the relevant subjects. The standards may go a bit beyond the actual language of the law, but they typically stay fairly close. Standards are technically not mandatory for the local school districts unless the school district passes a policy adopting the standards. School boards almost always do this. Also, the state standardized tests are based on the standards, so if local curriculum is not standards-based, students will probably not do as well on the tests.

The CDE then takes the Standards and produce what are called Curriculum Frameworks. These are suggested lesson outlines that teach the Standards. This is also where the CDE typically goes WAY beyond the law, because special interest groups get heavily involved in producing these frameworks.

Categories: Curriculum, Laws

No. In California, laws regarding education are called the Ed Code. These laws are typically fairly brief and address what must be taught or whom must be protected, but usually do not address how this is to be done.

The California Department of Education (CDE) creates curriculum frameworks for each subject. These are suggested lesson outlines that teach the state academic standards. This is also where the CDE typically goes WAY beyond the law, because special interest groups generally get heavily involved in producing these frameworks.

Once a Framework is produced and approved by the CDE, two things happen: 1) Private education publishers take the Framework and produce pre-packaged curricula that follow the Framework to be sold to local school districts, and 2) local school districts amend their board policies to specifically adopt the Framework. The Framework is completely optional unless the school board passes a policy that makes it mandatory for their district.

The local school district either develops its own curriculum to comply with the new law, or they buy a pre-packaged curriculum from a publisher that incorporates the changed Ed Code, plus all the other questionable stuff that the special interests added to the Framework.

It is important to note that the same special interests that lobby the legislature to change the Ed Code are typically the same special interests that subsequently work with the CDE to write the Framework.  So whatever extreme details did not make it into the Ed Code will often make it into the Framework anyway. Again, Curriculum Frameworks are completely optional but many teachers are led to believe that they are mandatory.

Please refer to the following article for more info: https://californiaparentalliance.org/state-curriculum-frameworks-are-merely-suggestions/

Categories: Curriculum, Laws

Laws

Once a new Ed Code is passed by the legislature and signed by the governor, the California Department of Education (CDE) incorporates the law into the “Standards” for the relevant subjects. The standards may go a bit beyond the actual language of the law, but they typically stay fairly close. Standards are technically not mandatory for the local school districts unless the school district passes a policy adopting the standards. School boards almost always do this. Also, the state standardized tests are based on the standards, so if local curriculum is not standards-based, students will probably not do as well on the tests.

The CDE then takes the Standards and produce what are called Curriculum Frameworks. These are suggested lesson outlines that teach the Standards. This is also where the CDE typically goes WAY beyond the law, because special interest groups get heavily involved in producing these frameworks.

Categories: Curriculum, Laws

No. In California, laws regarding education are called the Ed Code. These laws are typically fairly brief and address what must be taught or whom must be protected, but usually do not address how this is to be done.

The California Department of Education (CDE) creates curriculum frameworks for each subject. These are suggested lesson outlines that teach the state academic standards. This is also where the CDE typically goes WAY beyond the law, because special interest groups generally get heavily involved in producing these frameworks.

Once a Framework is produced and approved by the CDE, two things happen: 1) Private education publishers take the Framework and produce pre-packaged curricula that follow the Framework to be sold to local school districts, and 2) local school districts amend their board policies to specifically adopt the Framework. The Framework is completely optional unless the school board passes a policy that makes it mandatory for their district.

The local school district either develops its own curriculum to comply with the new law, or they buy a pre-packaged curriculum from a publisher that incorporates the changed Ed Code, plus all the other questionable stuff that the special interests added to the Framework.

It is important to note that the same special interests that lobby the legislature to change the Ed Code are typically the same special interests that subsequently work with the CDE to write the Framework.  So whatever extreme details did not make it into the Ed Code will often make it into the Framework anyway. Again, Curriculum Frameworks are completely optional but many teachers are led to believe that they are mandatory.

Please refer to the following article for more info: https://californiaparentalliance.org/state-curriculum-frameworks-are-merely-suggestions/

Categories: Curriculum, Laws

Religion

Historically (and medically), gender is binary, meaning two possibilities: male or female. One or the other.

Modern Transgenderism introduces the theory that gender is non-binary, meaning not just male or female. Typically, the belief among Transgenderists is that there may be an infinite number of genders. As far as we can tell, there is no credible scientific basis for this assertion.

Categories: Religion, Science

Science

Historically (and medically), gender is binary, meaning two possibilities: male or female. One or the other.

Modern Transgenderism introduces the theory that gender is non-binary, meaning not just male or female. Typically, the belief among Transgenderists is that there may be an infinite number of genders. As far as we can tell, there is no credible scientific basis for this assertion.

Categories: Religion, Science

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